Home Cookin’ not the Breaking Bad kind

Often tossed around is the idea, concept, fear, anticipation? of “What if SHTF!?!?!”  Many people spend a great deal of time and effort stock piling, building, prepping if you will, for this exact scenario.  Again I’m going to drop the “Skill sets over Assets” concept, because honestly I believe its a worthwhile pursuit over filling up one of my closets with baby corn so I can make my beloved Chinese food if I’m on lockdown at the ol’ homestead.  If your really “prepared” for this scenario, then let me ask, what do you know about fermentation?

The chemistry that makes much of our modern world what it is can be overlooked as a viable source of knowledge.  The process of fermentation is one of the oldest methods of food and water preservation.  It is also a step in the direction of making homemade alcohol, which has many more uses than just knocking back a cold beer on a hot summer day.  I implore you to forego your next trip to the supermarket to buy their entire stock of powdered milk to instead stop by your local library, you know that place that still carries real books, or yeah I suppose you could just use google, but take a serious look at the process of fermentation and how you can add that knowledge to your skill set.  You could even stop by your local homebrew store and talk to them about beer, wine, and cheese making(all of which require fermentation).  You might just pick up a new hobby to offset the ridiculous cost of craft beer, or learn to make some wine for that someone special.  Whichever the case, it will be worth your time.  With that I’ll leave you with an old world recipe from my homeland for pickles which are reason enough to look into fermentation, because if you don’t like pickles, well we just cant be friends.

3 day sun pickles:

2lbs – pickling cucumbers (yes you have to use the ones for pickling)

2.5 tablespoons of salt

2-4 cloves of garlic

Large bunch of dill

boiling water

1 slice of sourdough or light rye bread

Sterilize a storage container like a large mason jar, you can do this by boiling it or putting it in the oven.  Place half the dill and garlic cloves into the bottom of the jar and pack the cucumbers on top.  Dissolve the salt in a little boiling water (skip this if your using pickling salt)   Pour the salt water in and add the rest of the dill.  Fill the jar to just below the lip with boiling water and place the slice of bread on top.  Place your jar in direct sunlight for 3 days.  If your water evaporates during this process just top it up, the cucumbers need to stay submerged.  After they are pickled store them in the refrigerator, or eat them all in one go!

You asked for it…

All This heat… I blame it on you! If you remember way back on October 29, 2016 I wrote a little piece called “Can you feel the nip in the air” explaining my love of all things in the changing seasons of fall and winter… Shortly there after Kris posted a blog by the title of “I’m dreaming… But it’s not of a white Christmas”, explaining how he was not “built” for the cold, and how the dark days with nothing to forage, mentally challenge him. In all truth I think that a lot of people follow that same sentiment. But take a look outside right now (it was 68 degrees on my porch at 6:13 this morning) and I think it may be time to reevaluate your thought process. According to the local news, which I watch with the sound turned all the way down… in the early hours of the morning… in my underwear… (Yes, I guess my actions are finally matching the grey hairs I have recently been cultivating in my beard) it has been around 30 DAYS since we have had a measurable amount of precipitation, and the temperatures are going to fluctuate between 96  and 103 degree’s for the next 14 days. What the hell is this, Death Valley? If I have to live in a place that you can’t enjoy being outside, I at least want a better selection of Mexican food to choose from! This summer sucks, this late summer and early fall is going to be filled with fire restrictions that deem camping senseless (if you can’t have a camp fire and cook outside, I just don’t want to go). Say what you want about the short cold days of winter, but it is a scientifically proven fact… When its cold you can always throw on an extra coat, but when its hot you can only get so naked. Speaking of outdoor activities, and being limited by the cold… How many of you have been outside soaking up sunshine, and participating in the same activities that you do every other summer? I am guessing that this weather has forced you to adjust your vacation plans, at least to some extent. My friends have been picking huckleberries for the last couple of weeks, but now they have to leave at 3 a.m. in order to get to the woods, get some picking in, and be back into town before the real heat sets in. No more hauling the quads up, packing a lunch and making a day of it. It’s just too damn hot.

So whats a fella or lady to do? Just sit inside and gripe about the heat? Well that’s one option, but you and I both know that s not going to get us anywhere. Some people use this time of year to take that boat out that they have to make payments on all year and only get to use 6 times a summer. (Personally, I think it’s too hot to even be out on the boat, let’s be real honest here. Its 100 degrees, you’re sitting in the middle of the lake with no shade, probably having some wobbly pops, your super prone to heat stroke, a sun burn is inevitable. The fishing is horrible. Even when you jump out of the boat to cool off, you have to worry about every other yahoo on the lake running you over. How safe of a recreational activity does this really sound?) Personally if I can’t be fishing or hunting, I want to be getting ready to go fishing or hunting. Enter living room scouting: Of all the years I have spent in the field, and reading books about refining my craft, I (up until a few  weeks ago) had never heard of a stereoscope. Basically a stereoscope is a device that is to be used in conjunction with two identical images (in a 10″ x 10″ format) that have been shot from slightly different angles (or elevations in the case of some aerial photos) and when used correctly they give a true three-dimensional view. For the avid outdoorsmen, this is a fantastic tool for scouting. The USDA offices usually carries quite a few of your local areas maps shot in 2 formats to be used in a stereo scope. If they do not, they will gladly help you fill out the paperwork that needs to be submitted to have the Aerial Photography Field Office in Salt Lake City Utah, send you the pair of images that can be viewed with the stereoscope for your hunting area, all for $6 a picture. What this does for the hunter is give them the ability to see exactly how the land looks, as opposed to the generalities that are typically shown on topographical maps. Whats even cooler than that, is that when you order your smaller maps, you can also order maps in sizes up to 38″ square. If you have these maps laminated you can use a use both sets of maps in conjunction, and use a grease crayon to mark the larger format map with probably hunting locations to be scouted when the temperatures finally drop. All this without leaving the comfort of your own bunker, I mean home.

Just because Summer has been miserable so far, does not mean that you can’t try to make the most of the remainder of it. Knives have to be sharpened, packs need to be cleaned and reorganized. This is a great time of year to get your hunting buddies together and make plans for this years adventures, dust off the maps, break out those last few packages of venison and toss them on the grill. Now is the time to get excited for the seasons to come, it’s also a great time to start putting away a few extra bucks to soften the financial blow that hunting season almost always causes (by the way its much easier to find ammunition and reloading components during the summer months too, when everyone else is focused on their tans and polishing their boats). Most importantly try to use this not so exciting time to be around your family and love ones, before we know it hunting season will be upon us, and whether you believe it or not, those are the people who are the most supportive of your primal drive to fill the freezer. Speaking of freezers, it’s all the way up to 91 on my deck right now, I think I will throw a little camo on my face, grab a duck call and crawl into mine. Come on winter, I’m waiting…

Just Tap it in

If you have ever assembled a lower receiver you know all to well that the tiny pins under pressure from the springs have a tendency to come flying out at the most inopportune moments.

To assemble the rear takedown pin, you must put the pin and spring in under the End plate when assembling.

Now if you ever want to change that end plate, or for some other reason you are breaking your rifle down that far, that pin will come out at light speed at the first opportunity.  Chances are it will also get lost causing you to spend much more time looking for it than working on your rifle.

The best solution to this is to cut 1/8″ of that spring off, get yourself a 4-40 tap, some oil, and a tiny 1/8″ 4-40 allen set screw.

Only cut threads slightly deeper than 1/8″,  depress the spring and drive that little allen screw home.

Now no more chasing springs, you can change your end plate at your leisure, plus it looks sexy.  Don’t forget to tap your holes straight!  We will take no responsibility for crooked holes, broken taps, etc.

 

I told you big things were in the works…

A couple of months ago I wrote you a blog stating that “big things were in the works”, and sure enough we came through on them. If you didn’t see Kris’s post earlier, Kris and I officially published a book (bet you didn’t see that one coming). It is called “Hunt with the Sun at your back.”, Think of it as a modern interpretation of “The Art of War” by Sun Tzu, that has been reworked and reimagined by the two of us, with the outdoor sportsmen in mind. Pretty fun stuff that will relate to almost anyone who enters the outdoors in  pursuit of wild game, or anyone who has done any amount of research into the martial arts. Even if you are just interested to see what two Idaho boys would do trying to rework a timeless military strategy manual, (Hell look at the picture above, even George Clooney is reading this thing!), this is a great book for you. We are very proud of it, and would like to think that it could find a home on any of your coffee tables. It is officially available for purchase through Amazon.com, and its prime eligible.

I promise that we will have more material coming out soon by way of blog and video, it just takes a bit of time to synchronize four different schedules into one. Tell us what you guys want us to write about, or what videos you would like to see. Just ask a question, and we will fire back with everything we got… “What style of fishing  do you prefer, and in so what is your favorite lure?” I (Grant) choose my lures depending on the time of year, and what species I am targeting. Personally I am more of a top-water guy.  As for right now, were doing more internet fishing, and my favorite lure is by far the “Shameless plug!”  (yep its another link to the book)

Grant Willoughby

 

Oh, the places you’ll go…

First off, Happy Fathers Day! If you haven’t already noticed Post World Patriot is GROWING, and changes are on the horizon. With fresh blood and new ideas pumping down the veins, we are going balls out trying new things to become a better Peer-to-peer group that is always at your disposal. Big things are in the works, we promise, stay tuned for more to come…

If you have been reading our blogs for any amount of time, you have surely seen that our topics have changed. As times have gotten different, we too have tried to adapt our material in order to try and match what is going on. But we are the same ol’ guys that we have always been, probably a little caddy, probably a little blunt, but still there looking out for those who are a part of our online family. But let’s be honest, we can only be serious for so long, and if we combat our own humor, what do we really have? Our humanity is what relates us all! I have seen Kris walk like he is in mid-taser attack, I tried to put on Brad’s tactical belt (we couldn’t get it small enough to fit Kris’s waist, and I almost choked myself out trying to fit it around my head and arm). We are not every other gun/hunting/fishing/foraging/prepping/survival website. Why? Because we are like you, we have a passion for our lifestyles, we love to shoot guns, bows, bottle-rockets, cast fishing poles, dig up worms, and gold, and mushrooms, hike to mountain peaks looking for horns, critters, or just a pretty picture, get mud on the tires, and crack a cold one in front of a camp fire. ( I also really love to use commas and hyphens!) Plain and simple, we at PWP are 4 individuals who, coming from different walks of life, have found the same finish line. Each respectively, choosing different skill sets in order to succeed. (No I didn’t use the crickets to start the fire, Jiminy is for food, but it was my belly button lint. Now I could make one hell of a wood plough out of Pinocchio’s nose though) Yes we poke fun at each other, and mix metaphors as we deem fit. We have different ideas as to the perfect firearms (By the way I finally entered the realm of 1964 by buying my first AR-15, with Iron sight’s no less) But we all came together in our love and respect of what we do, and of our common mindset of whats important. If you have stayed with us this long you share those feelings too.  At PWP what we have to share is knowledge and experience. We we want to gain is the same… Knowledge and experience. Every day I put a priority on learning something that perpetuates the lifestyle that I choose to lead. The more that you search the interwebs, the more you realize that people have decided survival is a great way to make a living regurgitating information that may or may not be true in order to look like experts. I am here to tell you, true survival specialists are about one thing, surviving at all costs. Kris told me about another of his martial arts teachers who said (hopefully I don’t butcher this) “if you want to get good at something, find the person that is best at it, and learn from them” Why would you want to learn something by the person that is the worst at anything? Nobody wants to have the worst burger in town, or read the worst book ever written, how about watch the worst Atreyu cover ever? Nobody wants to do that. (seriously that cover is horrible) Find people who know their stuff, and you will find knowledge that you can put faith in. On our staff we have two AR-armorers, one Smith & Wesson armorer, 3 better than decent programmers, and over 80 years combined hunting, fishing, reloading, and foraging knowledge. When you surround yourself with credible sources, and share your own experience, you gain more than knowledge, you also gain experiences and friendships. Put it all on the table, joke with us. If you have a question throw it out there, if we dont know the answer, we will find it. If you have a skill we don’t, tell us about it. I personally want to learn, and im sure that others do too. Be a part of the solution, make us all better, and lets pull out of this nose dive that our society has gone into. Oh, the places we’ll go…

-Grant Willoughby 6/16/2017-

Time management

A martial arts teacher told me once, “If you want to be good, train when no one else is training…”.  I not being the brightest bulb in the box took this at its most literal translation.  So here I am throwing punches on my way to get a glass of water, kicking down the hall when I go to take a piss, swatting flies with what I hope are lightning fast backfists,  and practicing my footwork while moving around the stockroom(this I am positive gave my supervisor an uneasy feeling about me when he walked in on what I can only assume looked like a schizophrenic believing himself to be attacked by a rabid group of capybara).

The point of this article isn’t to show you how unhinged I am, or that I was even a successful martial artist due to my strange training habits, but I’m sharing this story because that one conversation changed my perspective about skill integration, time management and getting shit done.

Like most people one of my worst enemies is time.  To be specific “I don’t have enough time.”  Time is a formidable foe to be sure, but sadly most of us aren’t even bothering to get in the fight.  You hear us talk about skill sets over assets all the time, but what good are these skills without skill integration, sure you can learn a ton of stuff, but is it worth anything if you can’t exercise that skill under duress?

Around a PWP campfire you might hear such strange conversations as, “I got the fire going”, “yeah, but can you start a fire with a cricket and the lint from your belly button?”  (PLEASE don’t try this… those poor crickets, I can still hear their screams).  All joking aside, this type of banter should get one thinking, did you start that fire with your bic, matches, or gasoline?  If your perspective is tuned to skill integration and your willing to take up the fight against “time” every fire you start you should be practicing(read integrating) the skills you have learned.  If your lighting up the fire pit in the backyard cause your buds are coming over for a beer.  Guess what you have nothing but “time”, your not lost, hypothermic, or otherwise in need of the blessings of fire.  This is where time management comes in.  Build a bow drill, a plow, find stuff in the yard or on your person as fire starter, at the very least get out your firekit (you have one right?) and use the ferro rod.

This type of everyday skill integration is what will matter when you actually need it.  Shift your perspective to see what skills can be utilized during every day tasks.  Do not become a victim of “I don’t have enough time”…. or you might actually become a victim in a bad situation.

 

 

Kris Anderson 2017

Trust me…. I’m a Doctor

As an avid follower of many online groups and forums I often see inquiries on people who are looking for advice on firearms, gear and/or ammo. While looking for options is never a bad thing, taking advice from a complete stranger or even a trusted friend or family member is not always the best idea. We have four members who are taking turns writing this blog and I can guarantee that if you were to pose the question on what would be the perfect carry pistol, you would get 4 different answers!

I’m not attempting to say that any of the answers would be incorrect but if you were to go and sit at the gun counter at any local gun shop, it wouldn’t take long to see that some people will buy whatever someone is selling, hook, line and sinker. If you or someone you know is in the market the best thing to do is go to an indoor range and try out different pistols. Personal preference of the salesman or associate should not be the only deciding factor on a purchase. The right firearm to own is the firearm you can use! By saying “use” I mean a firearm that fits your hand and one you can put lead on target.

Contrary to popular belief, there are far more options than the desert eagle or glock that is glorified in most movies! Don’t be afraid to fire multiple different firearms at the range, after all that is what they are intended for! Once you are able to narrow down a weapon that works for you, there are a few different necessities that one will need. Now if this pistol is going to be something that you are going to everyday carry a decent belt is highly recommended. A good rigid belt works best for everyday carry. I personally have tried everything from your $12 dickies Walmart special to the $100 Boxer Tactical Apogee gun belt. From my experience I like either my HSG (high speed gear) or Boxer Tactical. Why spend that much on a belt? I used to always just buy the “Walmart special” but let me tell ya, it is ALWAYS a pain when they fail. It usually happens when least expected and you’re not at home or near somewhere with another belt readily available. My issues were always where the belt buckle itself ripped from the belt. Was it from the excess weight from the firearm or my ever expanding waist? Your guess is as good as mine. After burning through a few belts I decided to get all “tacticool” and purchase a legit gun belt. This was a decision that changed everyday carry for me. The belts are usually overbuilt… hell that high speed gear one you could probably use to tow a vehicle with! The rigidity of the belt also supports the firearm well and you will notice that your firearm seems lighter! With a cheaper belt I always had to cinch it tight in order to keep my pistol from drooping or tipping out which is what I believe caused the issues with the buckles. Once again it is all about preference and it is probably something you have to try and not take my word for. Just as pistol purchasing, you have to go with what works for you.

For anyone looking to check out different pistols and or gear, we are always more than willing to let you check out ours or even go to the range with you and let you run them for yourselves. Between the four of us, we have plenty of different makes, models and sizes to get that ball rolling.

 

Brad Michael – 2017

You have been lied to…

How does that make you feel? To know that people have been feeding you full of lies for years. Maybe it was an accident, and they didn’t know any better. Maybe they had other motives when they intentionally steered you astray? Maybe they thought it was for your own good. I know what you are thinking, “Grant’s back on the keyboard, this is going to be a long blog about guns, break out the tinfoil hats!”. Well if that’s what you were thinking, I’m sorry to inform you that you are wrong (even though I could totally go for a long rant about hunting rifles, effectiveness of personal defence pistols calibers, or the use of light’s and lasers on firearms). But today were talking wild game.

There are definitely 2 sides to every story, wild game is no exception. Some people will flat-out tell you that wild game is disgusting. Deer is too gamey, duck is too fatty, bear too greasy, catfish taste like mud, squirrels are just big mice, and rabbit are supposed to be pets, not your main course. The other side will tell you  “anything with fins, fur or feathers is edible”. That is correct as for North American game, but we all know that just because you can, doesn’t always mean that you should. Take probably the biggest meat-eating, hunting, fishing,  red-blooded American we have walking the planet right now, Steven Rinella, and listen to his Podcasts. He talks about it all the time because people always ask him if a certain animal is edible. To which he almost always replies(and I paraphrase), “Hell yeah you “CAN” eat it, question is if you want to, and how does it taste?” To an extent, I have a little bit of a soft spot for people who fall into the first class, because most times people make such broad judgements about wild game meat from personal experience (often times consisting of a single experience). Any one who has spent any amount of time hunting, and processing game meat knows that you have to treat wild game slightly different then you would domesticated stock. In that you will also get different flavor characteristics, and poorly executed “experiments” with game meat have been one of the leading causes of people’s dislike of game meat all together, and it would be hard to blame them. Imagine if you will, that you had never ate beef in your whole life, and someone offered to make you a hamburger. Not having any experience with burger, that would be your basis of what all beef is like. Now imagine that first burger was overly salted, overworked, and burnt to a crisp. What would your general feelings of all beef be? It’s dry, its dense, and it lacks flavor. You and I both know that a good hamburger is none of those things, they are always delicious, juicy, and tender. Even at that, a hamburger is not the measuring stick of which all beef should be measured. Each cut is different and perfect to be used in different ways to enhance the natural character of the cut. Wild game is no different. Without breaking down every cut from every game animal, I say we address some common misconception’s (read LIES) that I am sure that you have either read or been told through the years.

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  • “Deer is too gamey” : All animals have a distinctive flavor profile wild or domesticated, don’t believe me? Eat a piece of chicken fried steak and a piece a fried chicken back to back (if you are going to cook both in a single day, at least have the decency to invite me over). both cooking processes are the exact same, both coating the exact same, but neither one taste exactly like the other. Why? because beef taste like beef, and chicken taste like chicken. If all you ate was chicken, beef would have a “gamey” flavor, and vise-versa. Deer just has a more pronounced flavor than domesticated beef (and in all reality “beef” bought from a super market hardly resembles what beef use to be. If given the chance try grass finished beef, as opposed to grain finished beef. it is amazing how much more flavor the grass finished beef has over the counterpart. Any one who has had the privilege to having high quality beef knows exactly what im talking about.) Venison does have one thing that most non-hunters are not accustomed to. It is lean (lacking marbling from fat content.), a 3.5 oz. portion of beef has between 150-180 calories, 2-6.5% fat and 22-22.7 grams of protein. Mule deer on the other hand has 145 calories, 1.3% fat, and 23.7 grams of protein. Fewer calories, less fat, more protein, completely grass-fed, completely free-range, non-gmo, what else do people want? I would guess that more times than not, the real cause of overly gamey meat is due to poor handling, improper cleaning, cooling and aging techniques. Don’t stress the animal, clean and cool it as quickly as possible, and I would put money on the fact that you will have delicious tender meat. (And while you are at it, there is no need to cook venison to “well done”, if you don’t trust an eye test, use a meat thermomater and aim for 145 degrees. then let it rest before serving. You wouldnt cook a filet mignon to well done, and I would recommend that you treat deer filet the same way.)

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  • “Duck is just to fatty for me”: This may very well be true as to domesticated duck which is around 4.25% fat, but wild ducks tend to be less then half of that at around 2% fat. No they are not as lean as domesticated chicken (at around .7% fat) but what they pick up in fat, they also gain in flavor. Wild duck meat is surprisingly dark and muscular. To quote the writer Jim Harrison ( The author of “legends of the fall”) “it is a crime against God and man to skin a game bird…” In truth, duck breast that has been boned out, with skin plucked and left attached is truly one of the greatest gifts from mother nature. The skin crisps quickly, and seals the juices into the meat. I tend to go with my “6 minutes or 6 hours rule” meaning I will sear them quickly on a grill and eat them medium rare (I know what you are thinking “Pink center bird meat! Your gonna get salmonella.” but in all actuality, wild ducks, having never been domesticated, carries almost no chance of salmonilla.) or I want to slow cook them all day. Waterfowl tends to toughen up when cooked too long (say to “medium well” doneness). But, much like beef brisket, if you cook water fowl for extremely long times at very low temperatures, the meat fibers will break down and become tender again. Smoked pulled duck sandwiches anyone?

  • “Catfish taste like mud” : If I have heard this once, I have heard it a thousand times. Yes sometimes catfish do have a muddy taste, and sometimes they taste as clean as could be. Until lately I never knew why, it turns out that the sometimes muddy flavor that you get from catfish is mostly held in the belly meat and the fat of the fish. So how do we guarantee that we will have better tasting catfish? Firstly stay away from the belly, or any meat that takes on a yellow tint. Secondly, when processing out catfish fillets you will notice that there is an area where the back  and side meat come together that will often have a look of light purple or red (kind of looks like a bruise that runs the whole junction between the two parts) that is the area where a lot of the fat is stored, remove it and you will have removed most of that muddy taste. Keeping the fish in ice-cold water before trimming will also help you more easily trim the fat away from the fillets, as well as clean the fish. Then all that’s left is to do is start-up the fryer, mix up the hush puppies, and get prepared for a wonderful non-muddy catfish fry.

  • “Bear meat is greasy”: Well lets look at that observation a little bit. We have all heard that bears are closely related to pigs… Turn out that isn’t true either. (now you can bust out that aluminum foil hat) pigs belong to the Suidae family, and bears belong to the Ursidae family. Pigs are actually closer related to deer, camels, giraffe and cattle. Bears on the other hand are closer related to dogs, seals and skunks. Now that I can take my Carl Linnaeus (considered to be the father of taxonomy) members only lab coat off, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty about bear meat. Bear meat should be handled and cooked like pork, both tend to (depending on the time of the year) carry a bit of fat, the animals can both be cooked in similar manners (I have a friend whose father makes wonderful bear bacon), and any recipes that calls for pork, you can substitute bear meat into. Bears and pigs both share one more thing… Potential for trichinosis, or a round worm like parasite that can infect you if you do not cook the meat up to spec. Best way to deal with the potential risk is to cook all pork and bear the same, get it up to 165 degrees and rest easy knowing that you killed what ever parasites were inside. Bear meat is tasty, but the way that it is prepared is the usual reason why people believe that it is greasy. Most people (under the advise of their butcher) make bear into pepperoni sticks and summer sausages. Both of those products are incredibly greasy to start with. If you ask a knowledgable butch (or better yet a hound hunter who pursues bears) most will recommend getting the shoulders turned into hams and roasts. both are super tasty and a fun way to better experience your game. Slow smoked bear roasts finished in the crock pot make for one of the better pulled style bbq sandwiches, or enchilada fillings that you could ask for. Neither will be greasy in the least.

When it comes to wild game we have all been misled, misinformed, or just been the victims of crappy cooking. What is important is to not perpetuate these mistakes. Each time a new person tries wild game and finds it tasty, we add another friend to the cause. Meals created solely from food that we have harvested are made wonderfully special, and are a great way to come together not only as families, but as sportsmen. Next time your buddy starts hassling you about getting home late from hunting and how your  spouse is going to make you eat crow, just tell them you have recently visited crowbusters.com and come to find out they have a dozen recipes that don’t look to bad.

-Grant Willoughby 05/21/2017-

Eating Out

This week we are going to highlight a few useful plants that are native to the pacific northwest.  You have no doubt encountered these in the mountains and forests already.  If you forage for mushrooms, pick huckleberries, or just like to hike be on the lookout for these.  If you make a habit of identification then you will be able to find these plants with ease should the need ever arise.  As with any foraging of wild edibles DO NOT consume without being 100% certain you have identified it correctly.

 

Bear grass

looks like a giants q-tip and easy to identify.  Always find these at high elevation.  The root can be boiled and eaten like a potato, but is very stringy.  The most useful part is the leaves.  They are super strong and can be used for cordage, natives used this often to weave baskets.

 

Fireweed

Can be found in burnt areas and clear cuts.  Young leaves and shoots are high in vitamin C and can be eated raw or cooked, treat it like spinach.  In early stages of growth when the leaves are still pointed upward the whole plant can be cooked like asparagus.  The unique vein in the leaves can help with identification.  Can have a laxative effect if eaten in large quantities.

 

Pineapple weed

I always found this in heavily trod areas like rock driveways, but it can be found in the wild.  Often referred to as “wild chamomile” it has a very pleasant smell when crushed.  The dried flowers can be used to make a tea just like chamomile.  The leaves are edible as well, but are slightly bitter.

 

Wild Ginger

Found in dark forests with plenty of shade.  Look for it in our old growth cedar stands.  Treat it just like commercial ginger.  Although in the wild variety the leaves have a stronger flavor than the root.

 

We tried to pick a few that are not widely talked about, but are plentiful here in the pacific northwest.  Again do not pick and use any wild plant or fungus without being positive you have identified it properly and understand its uses.  Have fun looking for these plants and shoot us some pictures if you find these while out foraging.

 

 

 

 

America, Second Amendment, Everyday Carry, Survival, Preperation, First aid

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